31 May, 2014

BASIC RESIGNATION ETIQUETTE


Some people try to make breaking up with Company X, Y, or Z pretty dramatic but really, it does not have to be like that. I feel that resigning is a person's right. If you want to leave, your current company cannot really stop you from doing it. Leaving a job and moving to a place where the grass is greener are all normal things. These phases are inevitable in any person's career. However, it should be done properly. It frustrates me when people just irresponsibly quit their jobs and leave the rest of the department to fill in the gaps without any word.

There is a right way to resign from a job and not burn bridges. I don't see why it's so difficult for some people to resign properly.

Last Monday, the first thing that greeted me was a folded piece of paper - not quite the proper way for a resignation letter to be submitted. To cut a long story short, this is not one of the best resignations I have ever encountered. The act of just leaving ( without any face-to-face meetings ) the letter on my desk, not showing up for work ( tsk, tsk ), and not doing a proper turnover all sum up to one word: disrespectful.



Photo Credit:www.myeclatcoch.com


Top 5 Basic Breaking-Up With Your Company Etiquette.
The things on my list for a decent resignation are pretty easy and it stems from one thing: BEING PROFESSIONAL.
1) Your boss must be the first person to know about your resignation. No pre-resignation FB announcements please.
2) Do not just ditch your current job because you are uber excited about this opportunity that you can't miss.
3) While advance verbal notice is ok, you still need to write a resignation letter.
4) Unless there's a special arrangement, do observe the 30-day notice ( some companies require just a 2-week advise ).
5) You wouldn't want to leave loose ends. Complete all your work and conduct a smooth turnover.


Quit your job if you want to, but at the very least you owe it to your boss and to the company ( whose hands fed your family and supported you for x months or years ... Harsh? Yes, but it's true ) to give them a decent resignation regardless if things ended well or not. One can easily say that he or she will not take the same path a second time, but what if you do? Just something to think about.Ü ☮..Peace + _Love + Good Vibes. RUSS.


35 comments:

EmmaT said...

I agree. It's totally disrespectful, plus there's not much chance of a reference if you don't work your notice. Over here, most jobs I've worked in are 2-3 months notice, so yes it's a long time, but industry is small in the UK, you will always pump into people who know you years down the line

Russ R. said...

EMMA
Sadly, there are people who don't see it long-term. A 2- or 3-month notice is quite long, but you gotta do the right thing so it doesn't jeopardize anything in your future. You'll never know.

JaimeLovesStuff said...

It is very disrespectful, I agree!

This post came at a perfect time. I am stuck in limbo with my job (unsure if I will have a caregiver after next week for my daughter with disabilities but am interviewing now) and I may not be able to give them the two weeks notice they would like but I would definitely give them the respect they deserve of meeting with the Human Resources department, my supervisor and the office manager to explain my departure and to offer to come in part time to help train the new person who would take my position (I am in Medical billing and work specific insurance plans) because they will need to know all the nuances of the payers.

P Bishop said...

Good information. Last two jobs I had I got laid off from without any notice. The job before that I quit, but I talked to my boss and gave two weeks notice. Great post!

Lisa said...

Such Great Tips Hopefully I'll NEVER Need Them LOL!

Rochkirstin Santos said...

My mom just resigned from her job last week and she asked us to review the letter. Yup, respect to bosses is very important and this must be reflected when writing a resignation letter.

Franc said...

Following this etiquette could also avoid creating a strain with the company as you still need them for future reference. Plus it would make room for a smoother turnover.

Tonya Lewis said...

Those are great tips it should actually be taught in middle school I think like when they teach you how to write a check Thanks

Joanna Sormunen said...

Great tips! Many people don't understand how important the last impression is, not just the first.

Jade Schwartz said...

I totally agree with all of your tips. When I quit my job I gave a month notice and still have a good relationship with the company up to now.

Julie Tucker said...

I agree there should be a level of respect shown to someone you have worked for and made a living at. One thing I've learned though especially with large companies is that once you give them your resignation letter, sometimes they just tell you today is your last day and let you go. So, be prepared for that. They just don't want any shenanigan's during your last days. Even though they know you won't do anything wrong. Prepare your wallet for immediate job loss. Just something to think about it.

Cococute Manaloto said...

These tips are very useful, I remember one time I decided to resign on my job the next day and it is really not a good image for your co-workers and executives if you don't have such an etiquette.

Cheap Is The *New* Classy said...

I do think people should leave with a notice and work it out. However, there are also instances when people should just leave, notice or not. If you are working somewhere and the bosses are letting people harass you, for instance, and doing nothing about it. I think every instance has a special and unique set of circumstances.

Sandy Sandler said...

I totally agree with all of your points. It should also go both ways with some loyalty of a company to a person they let go for budget cuts. lol

Rena McDaniel said...

You want to always be able to leave with a good recommendation and you may want to come back some day.

Masshole Mommy said...

I think it is incredibly foolish to burn bridges by acting poorly when you leave a company. Great advice.

Jeanine said...

This is great! I haven't worked outside the home since I was a teenager but I wouldn't think to do anything but give notice e and leave peacefully and respectfully not to mention professionally.

Stacie @ Divine Lifestyle said...

I totally agree with this. Way, way back when I was young, I resigned in a... less than respectful manner. At the time, it felt totally warranted. I look back on it now, and I just feel embarrassed.

Catherine Sargent said...

These are all great tips. I would want to leave on good terms so they would give me a good recommendation. I have always tried to give as much notice as possible.

Ashley said...

I worked a job for 5 years with a very high turnover rate in the Mental Health field, and can definitely attest to the fact that sudden departures without forewarning can be damaging both to the company/co-workers and to the clients themselves. Though I've never heard of giving 30 days notice, I would definitely say that 2 weeks notice should always be given no matter how you feel about the company/supervisor!

Kelly Hutchinson said...

This comes at the perfect time because I am about to resign from my current job. It is going to be sticky, so I need all the help I can get!

Lisa B said...

It is so important to always leave your job on a positive note. You might need a reference from them someday.

Chubskulit Rose said...

Doing it the right way always benefit you instead of just leaving without a word. If you quit without proper notice to the company, it can bite you when you look for a job again.

touristmeetstraveler said...

I have heard of many wild stories on how people quit their jobs, these are great tips; it's better to do it the right way.

Elizabeth O. said...

I agree about not burning bridges. I keep a good friendship with my former boss…

Gabriel Bregg said...

I've flamed everyone as I left jobs before and never really thought about the effect it would have on co-workers. Regardless of your thoughts of the company or your boss, there are people you've worked with that you like, think of them if not yourself.

April Mims said...

I agree! Some industries make it very likely you will encounter that person again at some point down the road. It's always better to not burn any bridges and just be a decent person.

Roselynn Mercedes said...

I can completely agree that it's a very disrespectful move on the end of the employee. I would have to hate a job really badly to just up and leave like that without a proper resignation.

Kori Tomelden said...

It's always good to remain on good terms with your former employer. You always need a good reference or two.

Chanelle Kim said...

Thanks for the reminder on how to properly resign. I know we all imagine the way we wish we could (for some reason I think of Office Space), but you absolutely must leave on a positive note since it's likely you will cross paths with these people in the future, or may need them as a reference later.

The Mommy-Files said...

These are some really great tips for respectfully resigning. Thanks for sharing.

Chene Atkins-Whittington said...

There are so many people that need to read this. I probably needed to years ago when I left my former job.

Ashleigh Walls said...

So important that if you want to have a chance with the company again you need to leave on a good note.

Debi said...

It is so important to resign properly. I have been the boss and it is very unprofessional

Soiree Design Studio said...

What a great post. It really is important to not build bridges whenever you move on from a job. Thanks for the tips.